Pedestrian Safety Hazard in PB

The community of Pebble Beach was designed as a semi-rural area to preserve the natural beauty and forest environment. There are no sidewalks or street lights, and the streets are quite narrow and often winding. There are many blind curves.

Ortega Rd. between Congress & Forest Lodge

Ortega Rd. between Congress & Forest Lodge

In short, it can be a dangerous place to walk, and many walkers are elderly. (In fact according the the last census 54% of households in the Del Monte Forest have members 65 years or older.) Exacerbating this hazard is the fact that many people going to and from work at the hotels, golf courses, etc. use narrow residential streets as “short-cuts”.

Ortega Rd. near Forest Lodge

Ortega Rd. near Forest Lodge

Ortega Rd., at the top of which the proposed apartments would be built, is so narrow, that when vehicles are going in opposite directions, one must pull over to let the other pass. In addition, there are drainage ditches on either side of the road. Similar situations exist on Majella Rd., Raccoon Trail, Sawmill Gulch Rd., and Sloat Rd. between Forest Lodge Rd. and Spanish Bay. Speeding on these roads has been noted by the Del Monte Forest Property Owners Association as a chronic problem, and additional enforcement has been contracted with the Highway Patrol and Sheriff. But it persists in spite of this additional enforcement.

The addition of a high-density, high-occupancy, workforce housing complex near the top of Ortega Rd. will most certainly result in more inappropriate short-cutting through the aforementioned narrow residential streets, further endangering pedestrians.

The so-called “transportation analysis” which was recently released is so limited as to be utterly meaningless. The figures for additional trips generated were pulled from a book; no actual on-site “study” was done. Further, the “study” did not account for minimum occupancy requirements of the inclusionary housing ordinance, and did not consider where these theoretical automobile trips were going. The residential streets (short-cuts) were not considered at all. In fact, only two arterial intersections were considered. In short, the “transportation analysis” (available at http://tinyurl.com/k8thm7d) is wholly inadequate in terms of the effect on adjacent residential neighborhoods, and pedestrian safety was not addressed at all.